Drinking behaviours

The North West Public Health Observatory (NWPHO) working with Liverpool John Moores University produced modelled estimates of drinking behaviour (among those aged 16 years and over) at Local Authority District level based on lifestyle survey data, hospital admissions, mortality data and population characteristics. Estimates for four groups were calculated: abstainers, lower risk drinkers, increasing risk drinkers and higher risk drinkers, aligned to national definitions.

Lower risk drinkers are defined as consumers of no more than 21 units per week for males and no more than 14 units per week for females. Increasing risk drinkers are defined as consumers of between 22 and 50 units of alcohol per week for males and between 15 and 35 units per week for females. Higher risk drinkers are consumers of above 50 units per week for males and more than 35 units per week for females.

The tables below show the modelled estimates of drinking behaviour for Crawley. The first table is an estimate of the whole population (including abstainers) and the second table is for drinkers only. In both tables, confidence intervals are very large and overlap. As such, the percentage estimates should be treated with caution.

Modelled drinking behaviours for Crawley; 2011

AreaAbstain95% CILower Risk95% CIIncreasing Risk95% CIHigher Risk95% CI
Crawley11.5%7.7-16.5%62.1%35.1-79%22%7.4-48.6%4.3%1.3-14.2%
South East12.1%7.3-18.1%63.7%36.7-80.3%18.3%5.7-44.1%5.9%1.8-18.8%
Source: Topography of Drinking Behaviours in England NWPHO/Liverpool JMU 2011

Modelled drinking behaviours - estimates for those who drink in Crawley; 2011

AreaAbstain95% CILower Risk95% CIIncreasing Risk95% CIHigher Risk95% CI
Crawley--70.2%39.7-87.3%24.9%8.2-54.4%4.9%1.5-16.3%
South East--72.5%41.7-91.3%20.8%6.4-50.1%6.7%2.0-21.4%
Source: Topography of Drinking Behaviours in England NWPHO/Liverpool JMU 2011

An alcohol related road accident is defined as a reported incident on a public road in which someone is killed or injured, where at least one of the motor vehicle drivers or riders involved either refused to give a breath test specimen when requested by the police (other than when incapable of doing so for medical reasons) or failed a roadside breath test by registering above 35 micrograms of alcohol per 100ml of breath. The statistic only includes incidents on public roads known to the police within 30 days of occurrence and so this is expected to be an underestimate of drink drinking behaviours. Data are pooled over three year periods to increase the accuracy of estimates.

In England, the rate per 1,000 for reported road accidents in which at least one driver failed a breath test has declined significantly between 2011-13 (27.6 accidents per 1,000 accidents, 95% CI: 27.1 – 28.2) and 2012-14 (26.4 accidents per 1,000 accidents, 25.8 – 26.9). In Crawley, the crude rate of alcohol related road accidents in 2012-14 was 29.3 alcohol related road accidents per 1,000 accidents (95% CI: 18.3 – 44.3 accidents), which is not significantly different from 2011-13 (35.6 accidents per 1,000, 95% CI: 23 – 52.6 accidents) or compared to the national rate.

The chart below shows the three year trend in alcohol related road traffic accidents in the three West Sussex CCGs between 2010-12 and 2012-14. As can be seen from the chart, there are large, overlapping confidence intervals at CCG level, indicating that there may be no difference across the CCGs.

Source: STATS19 data provided by the Department of Transport; Office for National Statistics (ONS)

Source: STATS19 data provided by the Department of Transport; Office for National Statistics (ONS)